How good are you in telling a story?
  • Screenshot 2014-08-18 11.14.11

How good are you in telling a story?

How many stories are out there, which just need to be read or listen to… But then, are we sure we tell them properly or, the other way around, we understand them from the narrator of the moment? Gavin McMahon refers there is an entire science involving storytelling. Stories stimulate emotions, which are the keys to better learning, memory, attention and decision making. Science teaches us that there are two parts of the brain (Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas) that automatically work when listening to a presentation, reading a book, watching a movie or talking with someone. However, although these parts light up in any of these occasions, our brain is programmed to pay attention and learn only when we perceive emotions at the same time. Here we get back to storytelling: the art of telling and touching someone feelings. The way we do understand and memorise things for a long time. Emma Coats – former story artist at Pixar – listed 22 rules to phenomenal storytelling, of which two are particularly essential: “tailor to your audience” and “structure your story”. While the first reminds to tell what’s interesting for your audience rather than for you, the second points out the importance of making a precise structure of the story, starting first from the end and going back to the body only afterwards. In summary, we do pay attention, learn and memorise things only when they are structurally and emotionally better conveyed. This might explain why we forget at least 60% of what we learn at school! However, what is sure is whether you need to engage your audience in your presentation or just need to tell the lie of the year (to somebody I’m sure deserves it!), make sure you follow these rules! You can’t be wrong, as they are at the bottom of Pixar success! Click on the link below to see the 22 rules to phenomenal storytelling: